Relational Coaching Conference

The 7th Annual Relational Coaching Conference will cover the theme of identity within the coaching relationship.

Identity

We are very excited about our topic for the 2022 conference, which is identity - a sensitive and sometimes contentious aspect of how we relate to ourselves and one another. If we think of identity as something that is part ‘given', but that mostly emerges through relationship and changes in different contexts, we start to reflect on our own identities and how these identities are changing. How we see ourselves, and how others see us has a profound effect on how we show up in our lives and in our coaching.

With so much happening in this sphere, we envisage a conference that will enrich our awareness and our understanding of identity, belonging, inclusion and exclusion, projection and reputation. What personal responses and questions are emerging for our clients and for ourselves through all this? How are these shaping our own sense of identity as coaches or elsewhere in our lives?

We will look at how identity is shaped unconsciously through processes of assimilation and identification and how coaches can assume more understanding and similarity than is warranted. We will also look at how identity formation may also lead to extreme polarisation, e.g. through what Freud called the narcissism of small differences.

Starting with the personal and interpersonal, we will explore identity in its contextual, societal, and political ramifications. Can we spot issues around ‘identity’ behind profound misunderstandings, in deep conflicts and issues of inequality? Are there ways to resolve these, e.g., by thinking freshly about what our difference actually is and what we might ultimately share beyond identity and at much deeper levels?

Event Details

Date: 30th September 2022
Time: 09:30-17:00
Venue: Ashridge House, Berkhamsted, Herts HP4 1NS

Ticket Prices

  • Early Bird in-person: £200

  • Standard in-person: £250

  • Early Bird Ends 31st July

Agenda

08:30 - Registration and Refreshments

    09:30 - Welcome and Introduction

      09:40: Keynote - An Ethical Promise to the Theme of Black Lives Matter

      • Dr Isha Mckenzie-Mavinga

      10:45 - Panel Discussion

        11:30 - Coffee Break

          11:50 - Parallel Workshops

          • Your Royal “I” ness. Lurching Between Grandiosity & Insecurity - Robin Shohet

          • The Possibility and Practice of Tapping into our Identity as a Coach - Linda Hunter

          • Stories and Experiences of Identity - "Who May I Choose to Be?" - Dr Anthony Kasozi

          • Is Leadership an Inherent Identity, an Acquired One or a Meeting Between the Two? - Talia Bar-Yoseph Levine

          • Working with Identity: A Jungian Perspective - Laurence Barrett

          • Identity – The Role of Allyship in Addressing Issues Related to In-groups and Out-groups - Hyacinth Fraser

          13:00 - Lunch

            14:00 - Keynote - Leadership, Identity and Revenge

            • Professor Mark Stein

            14:50 - Parallel Workshops

            • Technoselfies: Negotiating Identity Online - Tammy Tawadros

            • Two Cultures in the Room - Jane Darvill-Evans

            • Your Identity is in Question - Helena Territt

            • Hidden Relational Processes in the Coaching Relationship - Andy Williams

            • Professional Identity Development of Executive Coaches - Charlotte Goedmakers

            • How can Honouring Individual Identity Inform our Coaching and Work Relationships? - Barica Blenkus

            16:10 - Coffee Break

              16:30 - Collecting the Themes of the Day

                17:00 - Drinks and Informal Discussion

                  Keynote Speakers

                  Isha Mckenzie-Mavinga

                  Morning Keynote: An Ethical Promise to the Theme of Black Lives Matter

                  This talk will highlight the importance of creating safe spaces for dialogue about the impact of racism on personal development. Assimilation and the unspeakable influence of racism feature in transformation process, in forms that are sometimes not recognised. If left unattended this can influence levels of self-care, self esteem and the relational process. The talk will encourage reflection on the possibility of creating new ways of elevating self-esteem and being with others.

                  Dr Isha Mckenzie-Mavinga

                  Dr Isha Mckenzie-Mavinga, has thirty years’ experience as a Transcultural Psychotherapist, Supervisor, Lecturer, Writer and Reiki Master. She is the author of ‘Black Issues in the Therapeutic Process’. (2009) and ‘The Challenge of Racism in Therapeutic Practice’ (2016). She also co-authored an autobiography and contributed papers and poetry to several anthologies. The Handbook of Transcultural Counselling and Psychotherapy (2011), Making Research Matter (2015), Intercultural Therapy (2019), The International Handbook of Black Community Mental Health (2020).

                  She created Black Issues workshops, based on concepts created during her research.

                  She is transitioning from professional practice to creative writing and Art.

                  Mark Stein 2.jpeg

                  Professor Mark Stein

                  Mark Stein PhD is Professor Emeritus of Leadership and Management at the University of Leicester, an Associate Lecturer in Consultation and Organisation at the Tavistock Clinic, and an executive coach and organisational consultant. He has previously held posts at Imperial College London, London School of Economics, and Tavistock Institute, and been a Visiting Scholar and Adjunct Professor at INSEAD, Fontainebleau. He has been awarded the European Academy of Management’s iLab Prize for innovative scholarship; an Emerald Citation of Excellence; the ‘Group & Organization Management’ best paper prize; the Gavin Macfadyen Memorial Essay Prize; and the Richard Normann Prize, of which he is the only recipient.

                  Afternoon Keynote: Leadership, Identity and Revenge

                  The idea of revenge occupies a central place in our history, culture and literature, but has little place in the contemporary study of leadership and organisations. I explore the issue of the leader’s revenge and also offer a new way to understand it: while revenge is generally understood as the vengeance enacted towards the ‘other’, I argue that it may also be enacted against those who represent the ‘unwanted self’ of the avenger. In this sense, revenge is centrally connected with disowned aspects of our identities. I draw on the paper I wrote with my INSEAD colleague Gianpiero Petriglieri on projective identification, published in Organization Studies. Revenge scenarios in the Gucci family as well as from my own research and coaching are examined.

                  Workshop Leaders and Sessions

                  Robin Shohet

                  Robin Shohet does not know how to describe himself. His current interest is in exploring forgiveness as a way of loosening the impact of the self-righteous egoic mind. He is also an adjunct faculty on the Hult Ashridge Postgraduate Diploma in Organisational Supervision.

                  Your Royal “I” ness. Lurching Between Grandiosity and Insecurity

                  We are very committed to selling ourselves (world thought leader, global this or that), but who is this “I” that we promote?  And is there another “I” who is fearful, insecure?  Suppose this idea of a separate “I” is an illusion?  There might be a relief from not spending energy puffing it up or feeling defensive when someone seems to threaten it. Are you willing to question its existence?  To question not only your thoughts, but the way you think? Not a re-arranging of the deck chairs, but a welcome sinking of the ship.

                  We will examine concepts like paradox, shadow, undoing; try an enlightenment intensive exercise;  introduce the ho’oponopono forgiveness technique; perhaps try some improvisation drama where we can’t know what will happen next. Our aim is to inquire into the insecurity that comes from weaving the new clothes of the emperor “I”.  By the end my wish is that you understand when I say I hope “you” will get nothing out of this.

                  Linda Hunter

                  Linda Hunter

                  I spend my time away from my family working in Scottish public service and communities to help them shape the work they do and how they work together. I studied and started working in communities because that’s what I saw other people doing where I grew up in a west coast Scottish ex-mining community. I moved onto work in local and then national government because people suggested it, I was curious and it paid for a deposit on a nicer flat. I try my best to work with and on how power, inequality and trauma shape public services and people’s experience of them. Right now I’m working with people to improve suicidal crisis interventions. My approach is influenced mostly by the people and the work, but colleagues would probably describe me working from a coaching stance, drawing on Gestalt, systemic constellation, trauma informed and action inquiry practices.

                  The Possibility and Practice of Tapping into our Identity as a Coach

                  In this workshop, Linda invites you to join her in her ongoing inquiry into how exploring identity can be resourcing, challenge our perspectives on belonging, power and relationships and strengthen coaching practice. Drawing on her own experiences, a selection of simple practices and the experience of people in the room, this session will offer prompts and time for you to reflect and reconnect with how identity is showing up for you in your practice as well as the chance to explore new potential for action and experimentation in your coaching.

                  Anthony_Kasozi

                  Dr Anthony Kasozi

                  Anthony helps, supports and accompanies people as they seek to challenge, refresh and recreate their ways of thinking, working and relating. In doing so he engages with individuals and teams to stretch and change - innovating and building new abilities - seeking to address challenging issues, and to achieve extraordinary, shared outcomes.

                  Educated in international relations, business, occupational psychology, politics, and financial economics Anthony started his career as a Manager with Unilever in the UK. He went on to work as a Management Consultant with Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, and Coopers & Lybrand (later PwC), Ashridge Consulting and Business School and the International Federation of the Blue Cross Secretariat (Bern) before setting up Quilibra - an OD and Coaching Consultancy.

                  Stories and Experiences of Identity - "Who May I Choose to Be?

                  Early in our lives, we are gently introduced to a question that accompanies us through our lives. This question: "Who Am I?" - grows with us. At one time it offers the comfort of belonging and another the awareness of separateness. Gracefully it extends the promise of possibility and the power to shape. It has the ability to locate and anchor. It makes the act of "Naming, significant. It identifies us with space, place and time. What we are known by, influences what we may be known to be. It connects - bringing into our present - the light of events past and the shadow of events to come. It is now and future - it is presence and prospect, epitaph and legacy.

                  In this workshop we exchange and reflect together on possibility and power of who we are - through short and powerful sharing of "stories and experiences of identity". We will sit with each other, to listen, hear and exchange. We will take that experience into a conversation about the significance of identity - the way its finding, naming, and choosing matters and when it feels most present and powerful in our lives and interactions. We will close by reflecting on what that means for us by asking the question "Who we may choose to be" in our lives and through our roles.

                  Laurence Barrett

                  Laurence Barrett

                  Laurence Barrett is a Founder Director, of Heresy Consulting, working internationally as a leadership coach and organisational consultant. He holds an MSc in the Psychodynamics of Human Development from the British Psychotherapy Foundation, and trained as a coach and supervisor with the Tavistock Institute. He has also completed the Foundation in Group Analysis at the Institute of Group Analysis and holds a Certificate in Ecopsychology from the Pacifica Graduate Institute. He also works as a Practicum Supervisor on the INSEAD Executive Masters in Change and his recent book ‘a Jungian Approach to Coaching: The Theory and Practice of Turning Leaders into People’ is available from Routledge.

                  Working with Identity: A Jungian Perspective

                  Carl Jung suggested that identity is an ‘unconscious conformity’. We may define ourselves with words or symbols that we have accumulated from the world around us, but we rarely take the time to reflect on their origins and meaning, and the implications for our development. Identity serves to reinforce social bonds but often at the cost of the cost of our potential. While our identity remains unexamined, we cannot make conscious choices about how we are and who we are becoming. In

                  this workshop we will consider the formation of identity from a Jungian perspective, and explore some practical applications for our work as coaches.

                  Talia Bar Yoseph Levine 500x600

                  Talia Bar-Yoseph Levine

                  Talia trusts that the Gestalt philosophy of being is an infrastructure to human connectedness, dialogic leadership, profound leadership, the bridging of differences and uniquely contributes to a better world.  Currently she is chairperson of the Israeli Gestalt Association and its representative to the EAGT and co-chair of Jerusalem Gestalt Institute. She has been the president of IAAGT, member of the Intagio EC, the head of Gestalt MSc department at Metanoia Institute in London, UK, the academic director of an 8-year training in the Czech and Slovak republics and of 5 years training in Greece.  She is also part of training programs in organisational and supervision training in several countries.

                  Is Leadership an Inherent Identity, an Acquired One or a Meeting Between the Two?

                  How to stay authentic and true to oneself while assuming new aspects and abilities required for excellence as a leader - develop/enlarge one’s field of choice, capabilities whatever needs adding or subtracting. Leadership is an identity to assume, internalise and live in peace with, maintain, challenge and cherish.

                  We shall delve into questions challenging the consultant as well as the leader. Experiment, share personal stories, seek advice, think about, understand identity and attempt to unpack the process leading to the right personal choice, to become the best able leader that a person is able be.

                  Talia, PsyD, is a clinical psychologist, gestalt therapist, international trainer, supervisor, and business consultant. Rich experience with multicultural systems, international businesses and the bridging of difference.

                  Hyacinth Fraser

                  Hyacinth Fraser

                  Hyacinth is keenly passionate to support people to be the best version of themselves through coaching, personal and professional development programmes. She is a skilled and experienced Learning and Development Practitioner with more than 25 years’ experience of supporting leadership development and change in the private and public sector. Her work is also in transformative small group experiences as an Action Learning Set Facilitator. Additionally, she has designed and delivered Equality, Diversity, Inclusion and Unconscious Bias courses over twenty years for a range of organisations.

                  Hyacinth is a NLP Master Practitioner, Associate Member of the Association for Coaching and holds an MA in Social Policy and Administration. She is the co-author of two books about resilience, written through the COVID lockdowns, her latest being: `My Little Book of Resilience – 365 Daily Inspirations’.

                  Identity – The Role of Allyship in Addressing Issues Related to In-groups and Out-groups

                  Who has the power? This workshop will consider how Allies can help alleviate the oftentimes traumatising incidents related to the interplay of in-group and out-group bias. How does in-group and out-group bias show up in your (personal and professional) world? What do you imagine to be the internal and external manifestation of the impact of being on the receiving end of in-group bias?

                  Being the `grown up’ in the room takes courage and can come at a cost. As a member of the in-group, in the context of your own identity, consider what you are prepared to do both organisationally and personally to take a stand to address inequity.

                  Jane Darvill-Evans

                  Jane Darvill-Evans

                  Jane has worked for McKinsey & Company and Accenture and held senior leadership roles at BP and the Japanese pharmaceutical company Astellas, working in global teams.  She holds an MBA from Cranfield School of Management, an MSc in Coaching from Ashridge, and is completing a doctorate in coaching and mentoring at Oxford Brookes University.

                  Jane specialises in intercultural coaching for global organisations.  Her experience of living and working in Japan led her to found Sakura Leadership, a consultancy specialising in helping leaders work effectively across East Asia, the US and Europe.

                  Two Cultures in the Room

                  Jane is co-presenting this esssion with Lesley Hayman.

                  In this session we will explore how coaching can help coaches and coachees challenge and expand their sense of cultural identity.

                  Coaches can often feel anxious about openly inquiring about cultural identity. But these good intentions to be culturally sensitive can, at times, block the richness of intercultural exchange.

                  Through sharing stories from coaches across East Asia, we illustrate the power of having two cultures ‘in the room,’ and how differences in deeply held values and beliefs can be used as a source of learning. The session shows the benefits of using multiple cultures to provide the opportunity to work at a deep, emotional level. When we are brave enough to use ourselves fully this can lead to more options -- both for the client and coach.

                  The session will include an overview of intercultural coaching theory and provide an opportunity to reflect on and discuss your own cultural orientations, and the implications for your coaching work.

                  Lesley Hayman

                  Lesley Hayman

                  Lesley has 30 years’ experience working as a senior manager internationally for the government, UK universities and a FTSE 100 company. She has lived in 8 countries and had two diplomatic postings. She has an MBA from London Business School, a Professional Certificate in Coaching (PCIC), distinction level, from Henley Business School, and holds the ICF Professional Coach Credential (PCC)

                  Lesley’s specialist interest in intercultural coaching builds on her experience of living and working in very diverse cultures. She coaches leaders working with international teams in all five continents but has a particular interest in developing effective coaching approaches for leaders in East Asia.

                  Jane specialises in intercultural coaching for global organisations.  Her experience of living and working in Japan led her to found Sakura Leadership, a consultancy specialising in helping leaders work effectively across East Asia, the US and Europe.

                  Two Cultures in the Room

                  Lesley is co-presenting this session with Jane Darvill-Evans.

                  In this session we will explore how coaching can help coaches and coachees challenge and expand their sense of cultural identity.

                  Coaches can often feel anxious about openly inquiring about cultural identity. But these good intentions to be culturally sensitive can, at times, block the richness of intercultural exchange.

                  Through sharing stories from coaches across East Asia, we illustrate the power of having two cultures ‘in the room,’ and how differences in deeply held values and beliefs can be used as a source of learning. The session shows the benefits of using multiple cultures to provide the opportunity to work at a deep, emotional level. When we are brave enough to use ourselves fully this can lead to more options -- both for the client and coach.

                  The session will include an overview of intercultural coaching theory and provide an opportunity to reflect on and discuss your own cultural orientations, and the implications for your coaching work.

                  Helen Territt

                  Helena Territt

                  Helena Territt is an executive coach, and an ADHD coach. She also works with organisations on authentic leadership and corporate wellbeing. Her HR career spans start-ups, FTSE 100 companies and large Government departments, where she has supported teams to navigate issues such as the Grenfell fire, the Windrush review and the start of the Covid pandemic. Prior to the civil service, she had a successful career in the private sector with STA Travel and British Airways, where she developed the engagement, wellbeing, and inclusion strategies for 38,000 global employees.

                  Helena loves coaching people who think differently, who like to challenge the status quo and who won’t stay in their lane; people who question the way things “should” be.

                  Your Identity is in Question

                  *The paradox of weirdness: The weird parts of ourselves are actually the thing that’s normal. People are actually weird. It’s how we are born. What’s weird is the way social conditioning makes us seem more normal than we are. (Tyler Cowen)*

                  Masking, code-switching, fitting in, gravitas, flexing your style. We all do it. But are you doing it too much, not enough, or just right? How do you know?

                  After 40 years of a successful life and many years as a senior HR practitioner and coach, Helena was diagnosed with ADHD. She discovered that her brain doesn’t work like others, her experience of existing in the world is not ‘typical’.

                  This workshop will be an adventure into the parts of yourself that you keep hidden. How do you experience the world and who is your authentic self anyway? Are you normal?

                  Andy Williams

                  Andy Williams

                  Andy Williams is a psychotherapist, trainer and clinical supervisor and the Director of Learning for the Transactional Analysis (TA) Training Organisation based in Yorkshire. Andy works with a diverse range of clients including those from a LGBTQ+ background. His research interests include the supervisee’s experience of supervision and working with landscape and narrative.

                  Hidden Relational Processes in the Coaching Relationship – A Focus on Intersectionality, Difference and Diversity and Building the Client’s Identity.

                  In this workshop we will focus on relational processes that take place between coach and coaching client; viewing these through a lens of difference and diversity. Delegates will be invited to consider their coaching practice and the possible relevance of theories around prejudice and oppression, as well as exploring the theories of “callous objects” and “hostile architecture”.

                  Charlotte Goedmakers

                  Charlotte Goedmakers

                  As a social geographer in a steel company, a business manager with the city council, a non-technical scrum master with IT companies and a coaching Managing Director with a High-Tech start-up, she initially worked as an ‘outsider’ and moved towards connection by asking powerful questions. Offering a different perspective enables her clients to formulate their own answers and finding authentic ways to be effective in the challenges of their role as executive, entrepreneur, director, manager or professional. Her passion for learning, development and professional quality is driving her PhD- research: Professional Identity Development of Executive Coaches.

                  Professional Identity Development of Executive Coaches

                  Executive coaches are often independent practitioners, delivering non-standard personalised services, in one-on-one conversations, in the intimacy of the relationship with demanding clients. In how they do their work, dealing with autonomy and responsibility, they individually distinguish themselves from colleagues and as a collective from other helping professions. We do not know how they develop their own signature and how their diversity is recognised as a vocation.

                  In this workshop we will explore different perspectives in academic research and inquire how the concept of professional identity can be helpful in developing as professional and profession.

                  Tammy Tawadros

                  Tammy is a coach, OD consultant, supervisor and work psychologist. While training to become an accredited coach, she had to confront, and with the support of her peers explore and overcome her fears about the world of online and virtual working. This got her inquiring, learning, researching and writing about the underpinning psychology and relational dynamics involved in cyberspace and online meetings. She is also increasingly engaged in exploring technostress and the ‘technoself’ in relation coaching, learning, identity and difference. Tammy is a member of faculty at the Ashridge Centre for coaching where she teaches on AMEC and on ADOS.

                  Technoselfies: Negotiating Identity Online

                  This workshop will explore the vexed topic of identity, technology and online coaching. The emergence of the ‘technoself’ has both alarmed and intrigued us. During the pandemic we learnt to adapt to the online world, but we also missed and mourned being together in the same physical space. As our identity is largely situated and negotiated through our interactions with others and with our environment, this raises an important set of questions. How did, and how does being online, impact on our identity and our sense of self? What freedoms, illusions or masks does video conferencing afford? Are we more, or less ourselves in that medium? What identities emerge or indeed merge when we are relating to others in cyberspace? During the workshop we will explore how we amplify, hide, enhance and manifest our identities in the online world. We will also discuss some of the possible implications this can have for online coaching and for coaching relationships that rely solely or partially on video conferencing.

                  Please bring your laptop or tablet to the session and make sure that it is fully charged, and connected to the internet.

                  Barica Blenkus

                  Barica Blenkus

                  Barica (she, her) is an experienced senior executive coach and psychotherapist. She is curious about how people define themselves and how they find their own communities. Barica believes that people should be able to be themselves in all spheres of life. Over the last decade she has worked with many members of the LGBTIQ+ community and has become increasingly interested in how she can best support them in being who they truly are in their work environment. She is curious about identity and the influence that a clear sense of how we define ourselves can have on our life, at work and outside of it.

                  How can Honouring Individual Identity Inform our Coaching and Work Relationships?

                  In this experiential workshop, Barica invites you to look at what defines your own identity as well of those of your clients. How can one’s identity be honoured daily and how can it lead to working in an inclusive way?

                  Although you may see yourself as being part of a majority/majorities or a minority/minorities, being clear about core elements of your identity and making them visible to key people, could make a difference in how you create and experience your relationships in coaching and at work in general.

                  2021 Relational Coaching Conference

                  Watch the highlights from last year's Conference - Love Over Fear

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                  Hult Ashridge Relational Coaching Conference 2021